Teaching Your Own Children
Are you qualified to teach your own children? The answer is yes! It is challenging, but rewarding, to educate your children in your home. Find out what these challenges are and how to address them.
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Do I Need a Degree to Homeschool?

You should remember that you are the best person to give your child what he or she needs. Yes, you can homeschool, and yes, you are qualified. You are the best teacher for the job. You know your children better than anyone, love them more than anyone, and will do whatever it takes to help them thrive. 

Better Late Than Early: A New Approach to Your Child's Education
In this book, Raymond and Dorothy Moore look at the research behind learning styles for children. The message of slowing down and responding to your child's readiness is a welcome contrast to the common practice of pushing young children through the system. They conclude that the best environment for children to learn is at home. 
Homeschooling as a Mother's Right

Margaret is a homeschool veteran who explains why traditional schooling was never an option for her children. Margaret’s narrative documents the complexity of being a single Black mother and choosing to live in a low-income housing community, and not working full-time in order to fulfill her rights as a mother to do what she determined would be best for her children. Her account also demonstrates the role of faith, spirituality, and the complexity of building a curriculum to meet her children’s needs.

Taking Charge of Your Child's Education: A Guide to Becoming the Primary Influence in Your Child's Life

Every parent wants to give their child the best start in life. The best way to do that is to get fully involved in their educational process as their primary influence. This book is full of helpful information, resources, and tools that will lead you to home education success. Erica Arndt recognizes that the most important factor is the family unit relationships. This book will help you as you make your decision to homeschool. 

Teaching Your Own Children: Are You Qualified?
Homeschool Tall Tale: Parents Are Not Qualified to Teach Their Own Children
As concerned parents, we are totally qualified to teach our children. No one knows your child like you do. Your job is not to teach them everything there is to learn. Your job is to teach them how to learn, how to study, how to investigate and help them develop the love of learning. There is no greater job on earth. Is it hard? Sometimes. Is it worth it? You betcha!
Homeschooling For Dummies

This comprehensive guide gets you off to a great start. From helpful advice on how to decide if homeschooling is right for you, to how to get started, to complying with all legal requirements, you'll find what you need at the beginning of your homeschooling. Also included are teaching tips, advice on networking, testing, curriculum, and more. 

Am I Really Qualified to Teach My Own Children?
Addresses some of the psychological and spiritual concerns raised by this question within the context of links between parent-child teaching and holistic family living. Focuses on the bond between parent and child and how this relationship is conducive to a positive learning experience.
Am I Qualified to Teach My Child?
We’ve been brainwashed by the system to think that education can only happen when an “expert” or someone really good at a subject, transfers that expertise to another person. Actually, this is a very inferior way to learn. We need to trust the human capacity for learning things and figuring things out on our own, when we need to. 
Don't Waste Your Time Homeschooling: 72 Things I Wish I'd Known

Traci Matt, a veteran homeschool mom helps you make the most of your homeschooling efforts. She takes a look back at 20 years of successes and challenges, offering tested strategies to assist you on your home education journey. This book will help you learn ways to keep a peaceful home, stay out of the isolation trap, practice self-care, learn how to live with teens, and respond to the questions of others.

Making the Transition from Parent to Homeschool Teacher
Parents often tell me, "I'd love to homeschool my kids, but I don't think I'm qualified." Other parents are intrigued by homeschooling, but couldn't possibly imagine themselves as both parent and teacher. Is it possible for average parents to take on the enormous job of educating their children? Aren't years of specialized training required to become a good teacher? The answer to both of these questions is "yes." How is that possible? Because learning at home is very different from learning in a classroom.
Home Schooling Mom as Teacher
This article explores some of the challenges of reinventing your role as mother into teacher. Strategies include trying lots of ways to entice your child's interest in learning, inventing your own teaching tools, and learning along with your child. 
I Can't Homeschool Because I Don't Have a Degree
Not so! You absolutely can homeschool without a degree. Not only is it not required by most states that a homeschooling parent has a college degree, but it’s simply a misconceived notion that those without a college degree are not intelligent. Certainly that is not the case! The main requirement for homeschooling your children is a parent with a loving heart and a desire to give their child the best. You don’t need special training in child psychology. Remember, you know your child better than anyone else!
Transitioning from Parent to Homeschool Teacher: Are You Qualified?
Some parents believe they aren't qualified to teach their own children. Other parents are intrigued by homeschooling, but couldn't possibly imagine themselves as both parent and teacher. Is it possible for average parents to take on the enormous job of educating their children? Aren't years of specialized training required to become a good teacher? The answer to both of these questions is "yes." How is that possible? Because learning at home is very different from learning in a classroom.
The Myth of Teacher Qualifications
Most education officials publicly claim that teachers need special “qualifications” in order to be effective. As a result, public education organizations often promote legislation or an interpretation of the law which would require home school parents to have one of three qualifications: 1) a teacher certificate, 2) a college degree, or 3) pass a “teacher’s exam.” Although this seems reasonable on the surface, such requirements not only violate the right of parents to teach their children as guaranteed by the First and Fourteenth Amendments, but virtually all academic research documents that there is no positive correlation between teacher qualifications (especially teacher certification requirements) and student performance.
Taking Charge of Your Child's Education: A Guide to Becoming the Primary Influence in Your Child's Life

Every parent wants to give their child the best start in life. The best way to do that is to get fully involved in their educational process as their primary influence. This book is full of helpful information, resources, and tools that will lead you to home education success. Erica Arndt recognizes that the most important factor is the family unit relationships. This book will help you as you make your decision to homeschool. 

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Name That Country Game
"Dear Pen Pal, Konnichi wa! We've been to see Mt. Fuji. Name my country! Sayonara, Michiko." Challenge your group with this fast-paced geography game, created in 1992 by Educational Insights, Inc. Everyone begins at the post office. Players twirl a finely printed spinner (built into the game board itself) to select one of 60 countries. If the player can correctly identify the country's location on the board's numbered map, he or she may advance along the path to the finish. Bonus moves are won b...
The Unprocessed Child: Living Without School
This book shows how school is not necessary for a child to gain learning, socialization, or motivation. It offers a look at radical unschooling, a way of educating children without coercion, curriculum, or control. This look at a child who grows from childhood to adulthood with the experience of self-direction is a celebration of the success of unschooling. Covers topics such as parenting, self-discipline and self-motivation, socialization, and more. 
The Story of the World
This book series by Susan Wise Bauer is another that is best enjoyed as a read aloud rather than seen as a history textbook. It is full of engaging stories, mixing facts and historical legends. The companion study guides offer questions, narration exercises, activities, crafts, and reproducible pages. There are also lists for each chapter of supplemental books that are easily found at your local library. Story of the World: History for the Classical Child, Volume 1: Ancient Times (From the Ear...
Why We Homeschool
It is a common misconception that most parents homeschool due to bullies, school shootings, or bad teaching content. While these things are important, there is a higher purpose for choosing to home education your children. Even if all those things were corrected, there are stronger reasons to stay committed to the homeschool model. So why do you homeschool? This book looks at the meaning and significance of a true Christian education. 
Discover Your Children's Gifts
This comprehensive work on children's learning styles and creativity expression is a tremendous help to parents as they begin homeschooling. The authors discuss how God gifts children in different ways with different ways of learning and expression. This guide will help you identify your child's personality gifts and help them reach their full potential.